Daily Bread for 1.22.16

Good morning, Whitewater.

Our work week ends with a high of twenty-seven under cloudy skies. Sunrise is 7:17 and sunset 4:55, for 9h 37m 11s of daytime. The moon is a waxing gibbous with 97.5% of its visible disk illuminated.

It’s the birthday of Wilbur Scoville, born this day in 1865. Google has doodle to commemorate his birth, and in tribute to his creation of the Scoville scale:

…a measurement of the pungency (spicy heat) of chili peppers, such as the Jalapeno, Ghost peppers, and the world’s (current) hottest pepper—the Carolina Reaper, or other spicy foods as reported in Scoville heat units (SHU),[1]a function of capsaicin concentration. Capsaicin is one of many related chemicals, collectively called capsaicinoids. The scale is named after its creator, American pharmacist Wilbur Scoville. His method, devised in 1912, is known as the Scoville Organoleptic Test.[2]

On this day in 1965, Wisconsin claimed (for that time) a new world record:

1964 – World’s Largest Block of Cheese Produced

On this date The world’s largest cheese of the time was manufactured in Wisconsin. The block of cheddar was produced from 170,000 quarts of milk by the Wisconsin Cheese Foundation specifically for the 1964 New York World’s Fair. It weighed 34,665 pounds (17.4 tons). The cheese was consumed in 1965 at the annual meeting of the Wisconsin Cheesemakers Association at Eau Claire. A replica is displayed in Neilsville in the specially designed “Cheesemobile“, a semi-tractor trailer in which the original cheese toured. [Source: American Profile, December 16, 2001]

Here’s the last game in the Asia Fantasia series from Puzzability:

This Week’s Game — January 18-22
Asia Fantasia
We’re working on eastern time this week. For each day, we’ll give a three-by-three letter grid in which we’ve hidden the name of a major city in Asia, followed by its country, with a total of 11 or more letters. To find it, start at any letter and move from letter to letter by traveling to any adjacent letter—across, up and down, or diagonally. You may come back to a letter you’ve used previously, but may not stay in the same spot twice in a row. You will not always need all nine letters in the grid.
Example:
DHG/IAQ/RUB
Answer:
Baghdad, Iraq
What to Submit:
Submit the city and country (as “Baghdad, Iraq” in the example) for your answer.
Friday, January 22
IAN/BID/UMY

Daily Bread for 1.21.16

Good morning, Whitewater.

Thursday in town will be cloudy, although noticeably warmer than yesterday, with a high of twenty-eight degrees. Sunrise is 7:18 and sunset 4:53, for 9h 35m 11s of daytime. The moon is a waxing gibbous with 92.7% of its visible disk illuminated.

There will be a Zoning Code Update meeting in the city tonight at 7 PM.

On this day in 1935, Janesville sees an example of temerity:

1935 – Five Janesville Youths Arrested

On this date five Janesville boys, ages 13-16, were arrested for a string of burglaries, including the thefts of cigarettes, whisky and blankets. While in the police station, one of the boys tried to crack the safe in the chief’s office. [Source: Janesville Gazette]

Ten years later, on this day, America recognizes an example of courage and tenacity:

1945 – Truman Olson of Cambridge Awarded WWII Medal of Honor

On this date the Medal of Honor was awarded posthumously to Sgt. Truman C. Olson of Cambridge, for almost single-handedly stopping a German counterattack on the beachhead in Anzio, Italy, on January 30, 1944. Twice wounded, Olson nevertheless manned his machine-gun for 36 hours. He killed 20 Germans and wounded many others. [Source: Janesville Gazette]

Here’s Thursday’s Puzzability game:

This Week’s Game — January 18-22
Asia Fantasia
We’re working on eastern time this week. For each day, we’ll give a three-by-three letter grid in which we’ve hidden the name of a major city in Asia, followed by its country, with a total of 11 or more letters. To find it, start at any letter and move from letter to letter by traveling to any adjacent letter—across, up and down, or diagonally. You may come back to a letter you’ve used previously, but may not stay in the same spot twice in a row. You will not always need all nine letters in the grid.
Example:
DHG/IAQ/RUB
Answer:
Baghdad, Iraq
What to Submit:
Submit the city and country (as “Baghdad, Iraq” in the example) for your answer.
Thursday, January 21
HTM/NAE/OIV

Daily Bread for 1.20.16

Good morning, Whitewater.

Wednesday in town will offer an even chance of morning snow showers and a high of twenty-one. Sunrise is 7:19 and sunset is 4:52, for 9h 33m 13s of daytime. The moon is a waxing gibbous with 85.9% of its visible disk illuminated.

Whitewater’s Aquatic Center Board meets at 7 AM today, and the Fire/EMS Task Force at 7 PM.

On this day in 1942, senior officials of Nazi Germany meet at what’s now know as the the Wannsee Conference:

The Wannsee Conference (German: Wannseekonferenz) was a meeting of senior officials of Nazi Germany, held in the Berlin suburb of Wannsee on 20 January 1942.

he villa at 56–58 Am Großen Wannsee, where the Wannsee Conference was held, is now a memorial and museum.
he villa at 56–58 Am Großen Wannsee, where the Wannsee Conference was held, is now a memorial and museum.

The purpose of the conference, called by director of the Reich Main Security Office (RSHA) SS-Obergruppenführer Reinhard Heydrich, was to ensure the cooperation of administrative leaders of various government departments in the implementation of the final solution to the Jewish question, whereby most of the Jews of German-occupied Europe would be deported to Poland and murdered. Conference attendees included representatives from several government ministries, including state secretaries from the Foreign Office, the justice, interior, and state ministries, and representatives from the Schutzstaffel (SS). In the course of the meeting, Heydrich outlined how European Jews would be rounded up from west to east and sent to extermination camps in the General Government (the occupied part of Poland), where they would be murdered.

The Wannsee Conference lasted only about ninety minutes. The enormous importance which has been attached to the conference by postwar writers was not evident to most of its participants at the time. Heydrich did not call the meeting to make fundamental new decisions on the Jewish question. Massive killings of Jews in the conquered territories in the Soviet Union and Poland were ongoing and a new extermination camp was already under construction at Belzec at the time of the conference; other extermination camps were in the planning stages.[28][64] The decision to exterminate the Jews had already been made, and Heydrich, as Himmler’s emissary, held the meeting to ensure the cooperation of the various departments in conducting the deportations.[65] According to Longerich, a primary goal of the meeting was to emphasise that once the deportations had been completed, the implementation of the Final Solution became an internal matter of the SS, totally outside the purview of any other agency.[66] A secondary goal was to determine the scope of the deportations and arrive at definitions of who was Jewish, who was Mischling, and who (if anybody) should be spared.[66] “The representatives of the ministerial bureaucracy had made it plain that they had no concerns about the principle of deportation per se. This was indeed the crucial result of the meeting and the main reason why Heydrich had detailed minutes prepared and widely circulated”, said Longerich.[67] Their presence at the meeting also ensured that all those present were accomplices and accessories to the murders that were about to be undertaken.[68]

Heydrich, himself, did not live to see the unconditional surrender of the genocidal regime he served; he died of sepsis later in 1942.

Puzzability‘s Asia Fantasia series continues with Wednesday’s game:

This Week’s Game — January 18-22
Asia Fantasia
We’re working on eastern time this week. For each day, we’ll give a three-by-three letter grid in which we’ve hidden the name of a major city in Asia, followed by its country, with a total of 11 or more letters. To find it, start at any letter and move from letter to letter by traveling to any adjacent letter—across, up and down, or diagonally. You may come back to a letter you’ve used previously, but may not stay in the same spot twice in a row. You will not always need all nine letters in the grid.
Example:
DHG/IAQ/RUB
Answer:
Baghdad, Iraq
What to Submit:
Submit the city and country (as “Baghdad, Iraq” in the example) for your answer.
Wednesday, January 20
DRY/OAM/NJM

 

 

 

Daily Bread for 1.19.16

Good morning, Whitewater.

Tuesday in town will be partly cloudy with a high of fourteen. Sunrise is 7:20 and sunset 4:51, for 9h 31m 18s of daytime. The moon is a waxing gibbous with 77% of its visible disk illuminated.

Whitewater’s Urban Forestry Ad Hoc group meets at 4:30 PM, her Alcohol and Licensing Committee at 5:45 PM, and her Common Council at 6:00 PM.

Born 1.19.1809, it’s Edgar Allan Poe‘s birthday.

On this day in 1865, the 15th reserves well-deserved praise:

The 15th Wisconsin Infantry was received in Chicago on its way back home to Madison. The regiment was honored by the city for its accomplishments. It had fought in the battles of Perryville, Stones River, Orchard Knob, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Chickamauga, Resaca, and Kennesaw Mountain. Ninety-four of its members had died from combat and another 242 from disease.

On 1.19.1939, it’s a world record for a Wisconsinite:

rubberchickenOn January 19, 1939 Ernest Hausen (1877 – 1955) of Ft. Atkinson set the world’s record for chicken plucking. [Source: Guinness Book of World’s Records, 1992]

 

Here’s the Tuesday game in Puzzability‘s Asia Fantasia series:

This Week’s Game — January 18-22
Asia Fantasia
We’re working on eastern time this week. For each day, we’ll give a three-by-three letter grid in which we’ve hidden the name of a major city in Asia, followed by its country, with a total of 11 or more letters. To find it, start at any letter and move from letter to letter by traveling to any adjacent letter—across, up and down, or diagonally. You may come back to a letter you’ve used previously, but may not stay in the same spot twice in a row. You will not always need all nine letters in the grid.
Example:
DHG/IAQ/RUB
Answer:
Baghdad, Iraq
What to Submit:
Submit the city and country (as “Baghdad, Iraq” in the example) for your answer.

Daily Bread for 1.18.16

Good morning, Whitewater.

Our work week begins with clear and cold skies, with a high of five degrees. Sunrise is 7:20 and sunset 4:50, for 9h 29m 26s of daytime.  The moon is a waxing gibbous with 67.2% of its visible disk illuminated.

Whitewater’s Police and Fire Commission meets today at 1 PM.

It’s Martin Luther King, Jr. Day in America. Dr. King was born on 1.15.1929, and King Day became a federal holiday in 1986, three years after being signed into law.

On this day in 1776, James Wright finds himself a wanted man:

On the evening of January 18, 1776, the Council of Safety in Savannah, Georgia, issues an arrest warrant for the colony’s royal governor, James Wright. Patriots led by Major Joseph Habersham of the Provincial Congress then took Wright into custody and placed him under house arrest.

Wright remained under guard in the governor’s mansion in Savannah until February 11, 1776, when he escaped to the British man-of-war, HMS Scarborough. After failing to negotiate a settlement with the revolutionary congress, he sailed for London.

On December 29, 1778, Wright returned with troops and was able to retake Savannah. Although Georgia was never fully under his control, Wright again served as royal governor until July 11, 1782, when the British voluntarily abandoned Savannah before Continental General Mad Anthony Wayne could take the city by force. Wayne had already defeated British, Loyalist and allied Indian forces who, combined, outnumbered Patriots by at least 2 to 1, as he progressed through Georgia following the Battle of Yorktown. Facing likely defeat at Wayne’s hands, Wright retired to London, where he died on November 20, 1785….

Puzzability begins a new series entitled, Asia Fantasia. Here’s Monday’s game:

This Week’s Game — January 18-22
Asia Fantasia
We’re working on eastern time this week. For each day, we’ll give a three-by-three letter grid in which we’ve hidden the name of a major city in Asia, followed by its country, with a total of 11 or more letters. To find it, start at any letter and move from letter to letter by traveling to any adjacent letter—across, up and down, or diagonally. You may come back to a letter you’ve used previously, but may not stay in the same spot twice in a row. You will not always need all nine letters in the grid.
Example:
DHG/IAQ/RUB
Answer:
Baghdad, Iraq
What to Submit:
Submit the city and country (as “Baghdad, Iraq” in the example) for your answer.
Monday, January 18
JGS/NAH/EIC

Daily Bread for 1.17.16

Good morning, Whitewater.

Sunday will be partly sunny with a high of two degrees.  Sunrise is 7:21 and sunset 4:48, for 9h 27m 38s of daytime.  The moon is a waxing gibbous with 56.9% of its visible disk illuminated.

Friday’s FW poll asked about the likely victors of this weekend’s NFL games.  We’re only half done this games, with Seattle-Carolina and Pittsburgh-Denver to go.

Here’s schedule of posts for the week ahead, with other posts possible (if there are changes to these scheduled posts I’ll explain why):

  • Today: DB, weekly Animation post
  • Monday: DB, weekly Music post, WHEN GREEN TURNS BROWN post, evening post
  • Tuesday: DB, weekly Education post, evening post
  • Wednesday: DB, weekly Film post, a post contrasting Attorney General Brad Schimel with UW-Whitewater’s Media Relations director, evening post
  • Thursday: DB, weekly Food or Restaurant post, a post on Whitewater’s infrastructure, evening post
  • Friday: DB, weekly Poll, weekly Catblogging
  • Saturday: DB, weekly Animation post moves to Saturday, evening post

On this day in 1781, America is victorious at the Battle of Cowpens:

The Battle of Cowpens (January 17, 1781) was a decisive victory by Continental Army forces under Brigadier General Daniel Morgan in South Carolina over the British Army led by Colonel Banastre Tarleton, during the Southern campaign of the American Revolutionary War. It was a turning point in the rebel reconquest of South Carolina from British control. It took place in northwestern Cherokee County, South Carolina, north of the town of Cowpens….

Brig. Gen. Daniel Morgan.
Brig. Gen. Daniel Morgan.

Morgan’s army took 712 prisoners, which included 200 wounded. Even worse for the British, the forces lost (especially the British Legion and the dragoons) constituted the cream of Cornwallis’ army. Additionally, 110 British soldiers were killed in action. Tarleton suffered an 86 percent casualty rate, and his brigade had been all but wiped out as a fighting force.[5] John Eager Howard quoted Maj. McArthur of the 71st Highlanders, now a prisoner of the Americans, as saying that “he was an officer before Tarleton was born; that the best troops in the service were put under ‘that boy’ to be sacrificed.”[57] An American prisoner later told that when Tarleton reached Cornwallis and reported the disaster, Cornwallis placed his sword tip on the ground and leaned on it until the blade snapped.[58]

Historian Lawrence E. Babits has demonstrated that Morgan’s official report of 73 casualties appears to have only included his Continental troops. From surviving records, he has been able to identify by name 128 Patriot soldiers who were either killed or wounded at Cowpens. He also presents an entry in the North Carolina State Records that shows 68 Continental and 80 Militia casualties. It would appear that both the number of Morgan’s casualties and the total strength of his force were about double what he officially reported.[59]

Tarleton’s apparent recklessness in pushing his command so hard in pursuit of Morgan that they reached the battlefield in desperate need of rest and food may be explained by the fact that, up until Cowpens, every battle that he and his British Legion had fought in the South had been a relatively easy victory. He appears to have been so concerned with pursuing Morgan that he quite forgot that it was necessary for his men to be in a fit condition to fight a battle once they caught him, though Cornwallis himself did press Tarleton to take aggressive action.[60]

Nevertheless, Daniel Morgan, known affectionately as “The Old Waggoner” to his men, had fought a masterly battle. His tactical decisions and personal leadership had allowed a force consisting mainly of militia to fight according to their strengths to win one of the most complete victories of the war….

 

Daily Bread for 1.16.16

Good morning, Whitewater.

Saturday will bring increasing sunshine and a high of twenty-two to town. Sunrise is 7:21 and sunset 4:47, for 9h 25m 52s of daytime. The moon is a waxing crescent with 45.8% of its visible disk illuminated.

What are the secrets of World Championship Whistling? Four-time national and international whistling champion Christopher Ullman offers some techniques for success:

On this day in 1786, the Virginia General Assembly enacts the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom into state law:

The Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom was drafted in 1777 (however it was not first introduced into the Virginia General Assembly until 1779)[1] byThomas Jefferson in the city of Fredericksburg, Virginia. On January 16, 1786, the Assembly enacted the statute into the state’s law. The statute disestablished the Church of England in Virginia and guaranteed freedom of religion to people of all religious faiths, including Catholics and Jews as well as members of allProtestant denominations.[2] The statute was a notable precursor of the Establishment Clause and Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution.

The Statute for Religious Freedom is one of only three accomplishments Jefferson instructed be put in his epitaph.[3]

Daily Bread for 1.15.16

Good morning, Whitewater.

Our week ends with clouds and a high of thirty-six. Sunrise is 7:22 and sunset is 4:46, for 9h 24m 08s of daytime. The moon is a waxing crescent with 33.8% of its visible disk illuminated.

On this day in 1967, the Packers win:

1967 – Green Bay Packers Win First Super Bowl

On this date the Green Bay Packers defeated the Kansas City Chiefs in the first Superbowl championship. The game was held at Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles, with 61,946 sports fans in attendance. The final score was 35 to 10. For their victory, the Packers collected $15,000 per player and the Chiefs $7,500 per player – the largest single-game shares in the history of team sports at that time. [Source:Packers.com]

Tonight, the NFL Network [Plans] To Re-Air Super Bowl I For The First Time Since Game Day:

Here’s the final game in this week’s Band Mates series from Puzzability:

This Week’s Game — January 11-15
Band Mates
Glad you’ve joined us for this week’s musical pieces. For each day, we started with the name of a famous rock band that contains at least one repeated letter. Each day’s clue is the chunk of letters between such a pair, with any spaces removed.
Example:
GSTO
Answer:
The Rolling Stones
What to Submit:
Submit the band’s name (as “The Rolling Stones” in the example) for your answer.
Friday, January 15
USBR

Daily Bread for 1.14.16

Good morning, Whitewater.

Thursday will become increasingly sunny, and reach a daytime high of thirty-eight.  Sunrise is 7:22 and sunset 4:45, for 9h 22m 29s of daytime.  The moon is a waxing crescent with 23.6% of its visible disk illuminated.

It’s Benedict Arnold‘s birthday.  History.com has an article about Arnold, entitled, 9 Things You May Not Know About Benedict Arnold.

One of my favorite political cartoons is from 1865, in which the cartoonist depicts Benedict Arnold and Jefferson Davis being welcomed into Hell.  One should be properly reluctant to opine on the theological soundness of that assessment (being as it is a divine judgment), but as a political matter the cartoonist’s characterization seems about right.

This is a political cartoon, captioned "A Proper Family Re-Union" at the bottom. It depicts Satan and Benedict Arnold welcoming Jefferson Davis to Hell. The three figures stand around a cauldron labeled "Treason Toddy". Satan is shown in the center, dropping a small human figure (a male slave in loin cloth) into the cauldron, saying "I feel proud of my American sons — Benedict and Jeff". Arnold is on the left, wearing his military uniform and stirring the cauldron, saying "Welcome, Davis! Thou shalt be warmly received by thy father". Davis is on the right (with "stolen gold" at his feet), dressed in women's clothing and riding boots (based on a story that near the end of the war he fled disguised as a woman). He is also stirring the cauldron, and says "Well, Arnold, the C.S.A. are done gone, so I have come home". Skulls labeled "Anderson[ville]" and "Libby" at bottom refer to infamous Confederate prisons. Via Wikipedia
This is a political cartoon, captioned “A Proper Family Re-Union” at the bottom. It depicts Satan and Benedict Arnold welcoming Jefferson Davis to Hell. The three figures stand around a cauldron labeled “Treason Toddy”. Satan is shown in the center, dropping a small human figure (a male slave in loin cloth) into the cauldron, saying “I feel proud of my American sons — Benedict and Jeff”. Arnold is on the left, wearing his military uniform and stirring the cauldron, saying “Welcome, Davis! Thou shalt be warmly received by thy father”. Davis is on the right (with “stolen gold” at his feet), dressed in women’s clothing and riding boots (based on a story that near the end of the war he fled disguised as a woman). He is also stirring the cauldron, and says “Well, Arnold, the C.S.A. are done gone, so I have come home”. Skulls labeled “Anderson[ville]” and “Libby” at bottom refer to infamous Confederate prisons. Via Wikipedia.

Here’s today’s Puzzability game in their current series, Band Mates:

This Week’s Game — January 11-15
Band Mates
Glad you’ve joined us for this week’s musical pieces. For each day, we started with the name of a famous rock band that contains at least one repeated letter. Each day’s clue is the chunk of letters between such a pair, with any spaces removed.
Example:
GSTO
Answer:
The Rolling Stones
What to Submit:
Submit the band’s name (as “The Rolling Stones” in the example) for your answer.
Thursday, January 14
LLIC

Daily Bread for 1.13.16

Good morning, Whitewater.

Midweek in Whitewater will be cloudy, with a one-in-five chance of light snow in the afternoon, and a daytime high of twenty-one. Sunrise is 7:32 and sunset 4:44, for 9h 20m 52s of daytime. The moon is a waxing crescent with 14.4% of its visible disk illuminated.

For some, cold and flu season is a bothersome time, but if one had a dog like Gordy the Corgi, one would be well-prepared:

On this day in 1922, it’s a beginning for what would later become the ‘oldest station in the nation’:

1922 – WHA Radio Station Founded

On this date the call letters of experimental station 9XM in Madison were replaced by WHA. This station dates back to 1917, making it “The oldest station in the nation.” [Source: History Just Ahead: A Guide to Wisconsin’s Historical Markers, edited by Sarah Davis McBride]

Here’s the Puzzability game for Wednesday:

This Week’s Game — January 11-15
Band Mates
Glad you’ve joined us for this week’s musical pieces. For each day, we started with the name of a famous rock band that contains at least one repeated letter. Each day’s clue is the chunk of letters between such a pair, with any spaces removed.
Example:
GSTO
Answer:
The Rolling Stones
What to Submit:
Submit the band’s name (as “The Rolling Stones” in the example) for your answer.
Wednesday, January 13
TESTR

Daily Bread for 1.12.16

Good morning, Whitewater.

Tuesday in town will be partly cloudy with a high of eight degrees. Sunrise is 7:23 and sunset 4:42 for 9h 19m 20s of daytime. The moon is a waxing crescent with 7.4% of its visible disk illuminated.

Whitewater’s Parks and Recreation Board meets today at 5:30 PM.

On this day in 1888, a blizzard in the Plains kills hundreds:

…the so-called “Schoolchildren’s Blizzard” kills 235 people, many of whom were children on their way home from school, across the Northwest Plains region of the United States. The storm came with no warning, and some accounts say that the temperature fell nearly 100 degrees in just 24 hours.

It was a Thursday afternoon and there had been unseasonably warm weather the previous day from Montana east to the Dakotas and south to Texas. Suddenly, within a matter of hours, Arctic air from Canada rapidly pushed south. Temperatures plunged to 40 below zero in much of North Dakota. Along with the cool air, the storm brought high winds and heavy snows. The combination created blinding conditions.

Most victims of the blizzard were children making their way home from school in rural areas and adults working on large farms. Both had difficulty reaching their destinations in the awful conditions. In some places, though, caution prevailed. Schoolteacher Seymour Dopp in Pawnee City, Nebraska, kept his 17 students at school when the storm began at 2 p.m. They stayed overnight, burning stockpiled wood to keep warm. The next day, parents made their way over five-foot snow drifts to rescue their children. In Great Plains, South Dakota, two men rescued the children in a schoolhouse by tying a rope from the school to the nearest shelter to lead them to safety. Minnie Freeman, a teacher in Nebraska, successfully led her children to shelter after the storm tore the roof off of her one-room schoolhouse. In other cases, though, people were less lucky. Teacher Loie Royce tried to lead three children to the safety of her home, less than 90 yards from their school in Plainfield, Nebraska. They became lost, and the children died of hypothermia. Royce lost her feet to frostbite.

In total, an estimated 235 people across the plains died on January 12. The storm is still considered one of the worst blizzards in the history of the area.

On this day in 1864, during the Civil War, the 20th Wisconsin undertakes a rescue in Mexico:

1864 – (Civil War) Engagement at Matamoras, Mexico

The 20th Wisconsin Infantry took part in a battle in Matamoras, Mexico. They crossed from Brownsville, Texas, to rescue the American consul in Matamoras when he was caught in a local uprising between two opposing Mexican forces.

Here’s Tuesday’s game from Puzzability:

This Week’s Game — January 11-15
Band Mates
Glad you’ve joined us for this week’s musical pieces. For each day, we started with the name of a famous rock band that contains at least one repeated letter. Each day’s clue is the chunk of letters between such a pair, with any spaces removed.
Example:
GSTO
Answer:
The Rolling Stones
What to Submit:
Submit the band’s name (as “The Rolling Stones” in the example) for your answer.
Tuesday, January 12
DIOHE

Daily Bread for 1.11.16

Good morning, Whitewater.

Monday starts the week off with a high of sixteen and a probability of late afternoon or evening snow showers. Sunrise is 7:24 and sunset 4:41, for 9h 17m 50s of daytime. The moon is a waxing crescent with 2.6% of its visible disk illuminated.

Whitewater’s Planning Commission is scheduled to meet tonight at 6:30 PM.

It’s Alice Paul’s birthday:

Alice_Paul1915Alice Paul (January 11, 1885 – July 9, 1977) was an American suffragist, feminist, and women’s rights activist, and the main leader and strategist of the 1910s campaign for the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution which prohibits sex discrimination in the right to vote. Along with Lucy Burns and others, Paul strategized the events, such as the Silent Sentinels, which led the successful campaign that resulted in its passage in 1920.[1]

After 1920 Paul spent a half century as leader of the National Woman’s Party, which fought for her Equal Rights Amendment to secure constitutional equality for women. She won a large degree of success with the inclusion of women as a group protected against discrimination by the Civil Rights Act of 1964….

It’s also conservationist Aldo Leopold’s birthday

2004-0005_blackOn this date Aldo Leopold, a major player in the modern environmental movement,  was born. A conservationist, professor, and author, Leopold graduated from Yale University and worked for the U.S. Forest Service in the Southwest. He rose to the rank of chief of operations. In 1924 he became associate director of the Forest Products Laboratory at Madison. In 1933 he was appointed chair of game management at the University of Wisconsin. In 1943, Leopold was instrumental in establishing the first U.S. soil conservation demonstration area, in Coon Valley in 1934. As a member of the state Conservation Commission, he was influential in the acquisition of natural areas by the state. His reflections on nature and conservation appear in A Sand County Almanac (1949). [Source: Dictionary of Wisconsin Biography, p.227]

Puzzability‘s Monday game begins a new week-long series entitled, Band Mates:

This Week’s Game — January 11-15
Band Mates
Glad you’ve joined us for this week’s musical pieces. For each day, we started with the name of a famous rock band that contains at least one repeated letter. Each day’s clue is the chunk of letters between such a pair, with any spaces removed.
Example:
GSTO
Answer:
The Rolling Stones
What to Submit:
Submit the band’s name (as “The Rolling Stones” in the example) for your answer.
Monday, January 11
RLJ

Daily Bread for 1.9.16

Good morning, Whitewater.

We’ll have a cloudy Saturday with a high of thirty-four.  Updated: Sunrise is 7:24 and sunset is 4:39, for 9h 15m 02s of daytime.  We’ve a new moon today.

On this day in 1975, scientists made a discovery previously-known only to residents near the Sierra Madre Mountains, in eastern Mexico: the discovery of the Mountain of Butterflies, where monarchs in North America migrate.

 

On this day in 1863, the 23rd Wisconsin sees action:

1863 – (Civil War) Battle of Arkansas Post begins

The Battle of Arkansas Post, also called Fort Hindman, began on this day near the mouth of the Arkansas River. The 23rd Wisconsin Infantry was in the thick of the action all three days.

Daily Bread for 1.8.16

Good morning, Whitewater.

Our first work week of the years ends with rain (not snow!), and a high of thirty-nine. Sunrise is 7:24 and sunset 4:38, for 9h 13m 43s of daytime. The moon is a waning crescent with 2.7% of its visible disk illuminated.

On this day in 1877, Crazy Horse fights his last battle:

On January 8, 1877, General Miles found Crazy Horse’s camp along Montana’s Tongue River. U.S. soldiers opened fire with their big wagon-mounted guns, driving the Indians from their warm tents out into a raging blizzard. Crazy Horse and his warriors managed to regroup on a ridge and return fire, but most of their ammunition was gone, and they were reduced to fighting with bows and arrows. They managed to hold off the soldiers long enough for the women and children to escape under cover of the blinding blizzard before they turned to follow them.

Though he had escaped decisive defeat, Crazy Horse realized that Miles and his well-equipped cavalry troops would eventually hunt down and destroy his cold, hungry followers. On May 6, 1877, Crazy Horse led approximately 1,100 Indians to the Red Cloud reservation near Nebraska’s Fort Robinson and surrendered. Five months later, a guard fatally stabbed him after he allegedly resisted imprisonment by Indian policemen.

Here’s the Friday game in Puzzability‘s Sweet Sixteen series:

This Week’s Game — January 4-8
Sweet Sixteen
Happy 2016! For each day this week, we’ll give an eight-letter word or phrase and a trivia question. The 16-letter answer to that question (a title, name, or place) uses only the eight letters given.
Example:
HISTOGEN: What Rod Stewart song was his first U.S. #1 after “Maggie May,” five years later?
Answer:
“Tonight’s the Night”
What to Submit:
Submit the 16-letter title, name, or place (as “Tonight’s the Night” in the example) for your answer.
Friday, January 8
ORGANIST: What song about the weather from The Fantasticks was recorded by Barbra Streisand for her debut album?

 

Daily Bread for 1.7.16

Good morning, Whitewater.

We’re seven days into the new year, and the seventh of those days arrives in whitewater with an even chance of rain and a mild high of thirty-six. Sunrise is 7:25 and sunset 4:37, for 9h 12m 28s of daytime. The moon today is a waning crescent with 7% of its visible disk illuminated.

Every so often, someone will write to me and ask why the Daily Bread post often includes moments in history from other places in Wisconsin or America.  (Thanks, as always, for those questions.)  There are two reasons: first because it seems to me to be interesting, and second because I believe a hyper-local focus without daily reflection on events in faraway places leads to myopia.  Local policy is made better when one begins with a reminder of the obvious: that we are no mere place of beauty, but a place of beauty made incomparably lovelier by its connection to a continental culture and civilization.

On this day in 1945, General Montgomery unjustifiably claims credit for himself, but eleven days later Prime Minister Churchill rightly sets the record straight:

On this day, British Gen. Bernard Montgomery gives a press conference in which he all but claims complete credit for saving the Allied cause in the Battle of the Bulge. He was almost removed from his command because of the resulting American outcry….

Montgomery had already earned the ire of many American officers because of his cautiousness in the field, arrogance off the field, and willingness to disparage his American counterparts. The last straw was Montgomery’s whitewashing of the Battle of the Bulge facts to assembled reporters in his battlefield headquarters—he made his performance in the Ardennes sound not only more heroic but decisive, which necessarily underplayed the Americans’ performance. Since the loss of American life in the battle was tremendous and the surrender of 7,500 members of the 106th Infantry humiliating, Gen. Omar Bradley complained loudly to Dwight D. Eisenhower, who passed the complaints on to Churchill. On January 18, Churchill addressed Parliament and announced in no uncertain terms that the “Bulge” was an American battle—and an American victory.

On this day in 1901, Fighting Bob first takes office as Gov. La Follette:

1901 – Robert Marion La Follette Inaugurated as Governor

On this date Robert M. La Follette was inaugurated as governor after winning the November 6, 1900 election. La Follette was born in Dane County in 1855. A Wisconsin Law School graduate and three-term member of congress, La Follette was renowned for his oratorical style. He was the first Wisconsin-born individual to serve as governor.

Here’s the Thursday game from Puzzability‘s week-long Sweet Sixteen series:

This Week’s Game — January 4-8
Sweet Sixteen
Happy 2016! For each day this week, we’ll give an eight-letter word or phrase and a trivia question. The 16-letter answer to that question (a title, name, or place) uses only the eight letters given.
Example:
HISTOGEN: What Rod Stewart song was his first U.S. #1 after “Maggie May,” five years later?
Answer:
“Tonight’s the Night”
What to Submit:
Submit the 16-letter title, name, or place (as “Tonight’s the Night” in the example) for your answer.
Thursday, January 7
CORDELIA: What luxury car was appropriately developed for the manufacturer’s fiftieth anniversary?

 

Daily Bread for 1.6.16

Good morning, Whitewater.

Midweek in the Whippet City brings a mostly cloudy day with a high of thirty-two. Sunrise is 7:25 and sunset 4:36 for 9h 11m 17s of daytime. The moon is a waning crescent with 13.3% of its visible disk illuminated.

It may be cloudy, but that doesn’t mean a good day doesn’t await.  I’m an optimist about our future, but even as an optimist some days seem notably promising.

Whitewater’s Board of Zoning Appeals meets this morning at 8:30 AM.

This is the week for the 2016 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.  It’s a gadget-geek cornucopia, and The Verge has coverage of the events.  Here’s a look at a some of the goings on:

On this day in 1921, some women in Janesville commit themselves to a policy of abhorrence (and an abhorrent policy):

1921 – Janesville Women Abhor Salacious Entertainment

On this date the Janesville Federation of Women decided to “censor” movies and vaudeville in the city. Members of this organization praised and promoted what they considered “better offerings.” They were zealously critical towards those of a “salacious” nature. No follow-up ever determined whether the women were successful in their quest or if the increased publicity for “salacious” shows backfired. [Source:Janesville Gazette]

Here’s the Wednesday game from Puzzability:

This Week’s Game — January 4-8
Sweet Sixteen
Happy 2016! For each day this week, we’ll give an eight-letter word or phrase and a trivia question. The 16-letter answer to that question (a title, name, or place) uses only the eight letters given.
Example:
HISTOGEN: What Rod Stewart song was his first U.S. #1 after “Maggie May,” five years later?
Answer:
“Tonight’s the Night”
What to Submit:
Submit the 16-letter title, name, or place (as “Tonight’s the Night” in the example) for your answer.
Wednesday, January 6
BALUSTER: What W.C. Handy song is named for a historic thoroughfare in Memphis, Tennessee?

Daily Bread for 1.5.16

Good morning, Whitewater.

Tuesday in town will be mostly sunny with a high of thirty.  Sunrise is 7:25 and sunset 4:35, for 9h 10m 10s of daytime.  The moon is a waning crescent with 20.6% of its visible disk illuminated.

An ad hoc group from the Urban Forestry Commission (Heritage Tree Committee) meets today at 4:30 PM.

 

On this day in 1933, construction begins on the Golden Gate Bridge:

The Golden Gate Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate strait, the one-mile-wide (1.6 km), three-mile-long (4.8 km) channel between San Francisco Bay and the Pacific Ocean. The structure links the U.S. city of San Francisco, on the northern tip of the San Francisco Peninsula, to Marin County, bridging both U.S. Route 101 and California State Route 1 across the strait. The bridge is one of the most internationally recognized symbols of San Francisco, California, and the United States. It has been declared one of the Wonders of the Modern World by the American Society of Civil Engineers.[7]

The Frommers travel guide considers the Golden Gate Bridge “possibly the most beautiful, certainly the most photographed, bridge in the world”.[8] It opened in 1937 and was, until 1964, the longest suspension bridge main span in the world, at 4,200 feet (1,300 m)….

Construction began on January 5, 1933.[9] The project cost more than $35 million,[29] completing ahead of schedule and under budget.[30] The Golden Gate Bridge construction project was carried out by the McClintic-Marshall Construction Co., a subsidiary of Bethlehem Steel Corporation founded by Howard H. McClintic and Charles D. Marshall, both of Lehigh University.

Today is the birthday of a socialist whose supposedly successful community proved – predictably – anything but successful:

1813 – Utopian Community Leader Warren Chase Born

On this date the founder of a Fourierite Utopian community in what is now Ripon was born. Their inspiration came from the writings of Charles Fourier, a French Socialist who urged the rebuilding of society from its foundation as the only cure for economic ills such as the depression of 1837. The idea was supported by Horace Greely in New York and caught the eye of Warren Chase. Chase and others built a successful, non-religious communal society in which everyone received wages according to their skill, need, and work ethic.

The community reached their greatest population (180) in 1845 but soon dissipated when members began moving toward agriculture as an economic tool. Families gradually left the community to live in their own houses and work their own land in the same area. In 1850, the community disbanded and $40,000 in assets was divided among the remaining members. Warren Chase moved around the country and finally settled in California, where he held many public offices. [Source: Wisconsin Saints and Sinners by Fred L. Holmes, p. 94-104]

Here’s the Tuesday game in this week’s Sweet Sixteen series from Puzzability:

This Week’s Game — January 4-8
Sweet Sixteen
Happy 2016! For each day this week, we’ll give an eight-letter word or phrase and a trivia question. The 16-letter answer to that question (a title, name, or place) uses only the eight letters given.
Example:
HISTOGEN: What Rod Stewart song was his first U.S. #1 after “Maggie May,” five years later?
Answer:
“Tonight’s the Night”
What to Submit:
Submit the 16-letter title, name, or place (as “Tonight’s the Night” in the example) for your answer.
Tuesday, January 5
TAIL ENDS: What was the title of the 1960s-1980s American editions of the Agatha Christie book also known as And Then There Were None?

 

Daily Bread for 1.4.16

Good morning, Whitewater.

Our first work week of the year begins today, and I hope you’re looking forward to it as I am. Challenges await our city, but nothing that cannot be overcome, and much to which we can look forward. We have a day of partly cloudy skies and twenty-six degrees for a high. Sunrise is 7:25 and sunset 4:34, for 9h 09m 06s daytime. The moon is a waning crescent with 28.9% of its visible disk illuminated.

A quick note – I had promised posts on how UW-Whitewater (and now the UW System) have addressed sexual assault. I’ve delayed the posts only to consider to additional information. It’s a serious subject, and an ongoing one for this city (and state). I’ll publish posts when they’re ready, with the understanding that there will be more policy developments to address throughout the year. It seems there will, sadly, always be the risk and occurrence of some violence in society; there needn’t, by contrast, be any administrative self-protection and mendacity in a well-ordered society.

On this day in 2004, the American rover Spirit landed on Mars:

Artistic view of a Mars Exploration Rover on Mars
             Artistic view of a Mars Exploration Rover on Mars

Spirit, also known as MER-A (Mars Exploration Rover – A) or MER-2, is a robotic rover on Mars, active from 2004 to 2010.[1] It was one of two rovers of NASA‘s ongoing Mars Exploration Rover Mission. It landed successfully on Mars at 04:35 Ground UTC on January 4, 2004, three weeks before its twin, Opportunity (MER-B), landed on the other side of the planet. Its name was chosen through a NASA-sponsored student essay competition. The rover became stuck in late 2009, and its last communication with Earth was sent on March 22, 2010.

The rover completed its planned 90-sol mission. Aided by cleaning events that resulted in higher power from its solar panels, Spirit went on to function effectively over twenty times longer than NASA planners expected. Spirit also logged 7.73 km (4.8 mi) of driving instead of the planned 600 m (0.4 mi),[5] allowing more extensive geological analysis of Martian rocks and planetary surface features. Initial scientific results from the first phase of the mission (the 90-sol prime mission) were published in a special issue of the journal Science.[6]

Puzzability begins the year with a series entitled, Sweet Sixteen:

This Week’s Game — January 4-8
Sweet Sixteen
Happy 2016! For each day this week, we’ll give an eight-letter word or phrase and a trivia question. The 16-letter answer to that question (a title, name, or place) uses only the eight letters given.
Example:
HISTOGEN: What Rod Stewart song was his first U.S. #1 after “Maggie May,” five years later?
Answer:
“Tonight’s the Night”
What to Submit:
Submit the 16-letter title, name, or place (as “Tonight’s the Night” in the example) for your answer.
Monday, January 4
SHIPMENT: In what city (with state) is FedEx’s headquarters?

Daily Bread for 1.3.16

Good morning, Whitewater.

Sunday look much like yesterday: cloudy in the morning, sunny in the afternoon, with a high of thirty.  Sunrise is 7:25 and sunset 4:33 for 9h 08m 06s of daytime.  The moon is a waning crescent with 36.8% of its visible disk illuminated.

Friday’s FW poll asked readers if, on New Year’s Day, they’d watch a college football game.  Most respondents (76.47%) said yes, that they would watch one.

Two-thousand fifteen saw (at least) 83 rocket launches.  Here are those 83:

On January 3rd, 1777, following his earlier victories at Trenton and Assunpink Creek, Washington is again victorious at Princeton:

The Battle of Princeton (January 3, 1777) was a small battle in which General George Washington‘s revolutionary forces defeated British forces near Princeton,New Jersey.

On the night of January 2, 1777 George Washington, Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army, repulsed a British attack at the Battle of the Assunpink Creek inTrenton. That night, he evacuated his position, circled around General Lord Cornwallis‘ army, and went to attack the British garrison at Princeton. Brigadier GeneralHugh Mercer of the Continental Army clashed with two regiments under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Charles Mawhood of the British Army. Mercer and his troops were overrun and Washington sent some militia under Brigadier General John Cadwalader to help him. The militia, on seeing the flight of Mercer’s men, also began to flee. Washington rode up with reinforcements and rallied the fleeing militia. He then led the attack on Mawhood’s troops, driving them back. Mawhood gave the order to retreat and most of the troops tried to flee to Cornwallis in Trenton….

The British viewed Trenton and Princeton as minor American victories, but with these victories, the Americans believed that they could win the war.[43]American historians often consider the Battle of Princeton a great victory, on par with the battle of Trenton, due to the subsequent loss of control of most of New Jersey by the Crown forces. Some other historians, such as Edward Lengel consider it to be even more impressive than Trenton.[4] A century later, British historian Sir George Otto Trevelyan would write in a study of the American Revolution, when talking about the impact of the victories at Trenton and Princeton, that “It may be doubted whether so small a number of men ever employed so short a space of time with greater and more lasting effects upon the history of the world.”[51]

 

Daily Bread for 1.2.16

Good morning, Whitewater.

The second day of the year will be, for Whitewater, sunny with a high of twenty-nine. Sunrise is 7:25 and sunset 4:32, for 9h 07m 11s of daytime. The moon is a waning crescent with 46.7% of its visible disk illuminated.

One can be sure that a Star Wars tide has swept all before it when Sarah Reich tap dances to a medley from that film series –

On this day in 1863, Wisconsinites achieve victory for the Union, at a high price:

1863 – (Civil War) Final day of Battle of Stones River, Tennessee

This was the final day of the Battle of Stones River, near Murfreesboro, Tennessee. The 1st, 10th, 15th, 21st and 24th Wisconsin Infantry regiments and 3rd, 5th, 8th, and 10th Wisconsin Light Artillery batteries participated. The 21st was in the forefront all three days. The 24th lost nearly 40 percent of its men and almost all its officers. The two sides had traded control for three days until they both withdrew and the Union took possession of the field. The rich farmland meant to feed the Confederates now supplied the Union.